Confused authors and publishers bicker over what they call “Swedish history angst”

As Christmas approaches and Swedes engage in a bout of uncharacteristic tradition, historian and liberal commentator David Lindén argues that a “history anxiety” rears up to stifle public debate about the country’s less liberal and tolerant literary past.

“Less liberal and tolerant literary past” Oh my god! God forbid that we can’t completely erase the SHAMEFUL historical past of Sweden’s incessant racism that is all over our history! Yes, David Lindén, thank you for clarifying that you’re a “liberal commentator” fourteen words in…. like we couldn’t guess that from the fifth word and onward … when you say that “Swedes engage in a bout of uncharacteristic tradition” ….

“uncharacteristic tradition” What do you mean with this exactley? Like Swedes have some kind of “Jekyll and Hyde” situation going on over Christmas?

Christmas is coming and thus one of few times of the year when Swedes follow historical tradition. During Christmas more Swedes than usual attend church…

(Uh oh! WARNING!)

…and it is also one of the few occasions when most Swedes skip modern cuisine for the traditional Swedish julbord, which contains old-fashioned treats such as pigs’ feet in jelly and various sorts of pickled herring. As a Swedish food historian has pointed out: the julbord tradition is a tie with those who came before and those who will come after and is a tradition shared by most Swedes, young and old.

I bet this Swedish “food historian” receives government money to do what he does… Just look at that line: “the julbord tradition is a tie with those who came before and those who will come after and is a tradition shared by most Swedes.” Oh really, you don’t say. Wow, that is profound! Now that’s why you’ve get government grants and have a Ph D in “Food History” and not me. Classy, classy stuff.

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A Short History of Sweden’s Entitlement Society

During his long reign, Tage Erlander, Swedish prime minister between 1946 and 1969, spoke grudgingly of the impending “discontent of growing expectations.” He was referring to how the Swedish labor movement, after decades of expansive welfare reforms, rather than being gratified, seemed incessantly focused on what it had not yet received from the perennial Social Democratic government.
Erlander’s misgivings turned out to be accurate. The entitlement society is indeed a beast that feeds on itself. From 1959 to 1977 the total tax burden in Sweden grew from a moderate 25.2 percent to a staggering 47.5 percent, topping out in 1990 at 52.3 percent. During the same time, the public sector share of GDP doubled, while private payrolls fell, predictably causing a decline in economic growth. In 1970 Sweden’s growth was second in the world only to Japan’s; in 1990 it was second-lowest in the OECD, even as entitlements and the public sector kept growing. Hence, a familiar choice: Either stop spending, or keep borrowing on the backs of future generations.
But making such a choice is no simple thing. A universal welfare state has consequences that run deeper than the economy, and are more difficult to reverse even than a two-decade-long economic disaster. Fundamental structures of civil society wilt when human responsibilities—including those towards future generations—are subsumed under government entitlements (in Sweden, giving to charity, absurdly, came to be considered a lack of solidarity, since it undermined the need for the welfare state); a sense of passivity spreads when people feel that personal happiness or despondency is independent of their own actions. The bureaucratic framework of the welfare state also locks in electoral support as a growing share of the voters move from private to public payrolls—why vote yourself out of a job? All of these factors made the prospects for Sweden to break the vicious spiral bleak indeed.
Sweden is a country that only 30 years ago was on the brink of socializing corporate profits so as to continue down the road to ruin.
Against all odds, voters defied political expectations. In 1991 they removed the Social Democratic government, and put in place a center-right government that promised to attack the fundamental problems of the welfare state. When the Social Democratic party was voted back in three years later—as a consequence not of the reforms, but because the economic recovery was not coming soon enough—it continued on the road to reform, keeping in place the essential transformations.
Sweden is a country that only 30 years ago was on the brink of socializing corporate profits so as to continue down the road to ruin.
Excerpts from: weeklystandard.com
Ed comment: The article gives the illusion that it’s “better” in Sweden now. Sweden is still very much an entitlement society. There has been a very clever program of privatizations that gives outsiders the illusion that Sweden is much more “liberal” economically speaking. In other words less “left” and more “free market.” This is indeed only an illusion. Government regulates like a monolithic monster it has become and there are not many alternate paths for those who want to go above and beyond the playpen that the government has drawn for the tightly regulated business world. Government, together with the few mega monopoly companies regulate to a point where the smaller companies can’t keep up and fulfill the ridiculous jumping of hoop to attain licenses, inspections, approvals, paper work and not to mention the sky high taxes. The “competition” is effectively eroded away pretty early in the game. There is also, more worryingly, no incentive to work hard in Sweden. To “over-achieve” is furthermore a cultural taboo. From the article: “Folkhemmet” – Sweden’s Fascism in slow motion we can read:

After their big economic meltdown in the early 90′s (huge unemployment and welfare benefits that could no longer be paid for) they undertook an exemplary program of privatizations and made big cuts to both taxes and welfare benefits but there are still huge disincentives to work in Sweden. Incomes are kept pretty uniform regardless of what you do — meaning that there is little incentive either to improve one’s skills or to work hard — and the sickness benefit side of the welfare system is still a huge racket. People on sickness benefits no longer get a higher income than they would by working but the benefits are still close to wages and access to the system is very easy. So huge numbers of Swedes have declared themselves too ill to work.

As a consequence, average Swedish incomes have fallen well behind American standards — as indexed by the most objective criterion we have: GDP per capita. When purchasing power is taken into account, the picture is even worse. A cup of coffee, for instance, is likely to cost you three times as much in Sweden as in the USA.
There is much more behind the “transition” from the seemingly endless reign of Tage Erlander, Olof Palme and the social democrats, then the article suggests. When the question was raised to potentially socialize corporate profits, at some point around 1985, it must have been “decided” at a higher level to simply remove Palme from his position of power. Palme was assassinated in February 1986.
But the tyranny remains and slowly.. SLOWLY Sweden is moving in a direction of centralization, control and totalitarian social planning.

Sweden aims to be cashless society

From: AlJazeera.com

With just three per cent of all financial transactions involving cash, country moves to eliminate physical legal tender.

Swedes are among the technologically savvy people on the planet, based on their high rates of use of mobile phones and internet banking.

In fact, only three per cent of all financial transactions in the country are made using cash these days. Even public transport tickets can now be pre-paid using mobile phone technology, and most people use similar services to pay for everything from groceries to major purchases.

Al Jazeera’s Linda Nyberg reports from Stockholm, the Swedish capital.

Article from: aljazeera.com

Swedish Zionist Ewa Björling Attends the Bilderberg Meeting in 2011


Here is Ewa Björling at the 2009 Sweden-Israel National Association held at Västerås City Hall.

I’m always amused to see whom of the Bilderberg Attendants are from Sweden. Usually there are three to five …or so.

You always get “the regulars” like former Prime Minister of Sweden and current Minister of Foreign Affairs Carl Bildt and Jacob Wallenberg, Chairman of Investor.

No change this year.

There was also a new name, Ewa Björling, the Minister for Trade.

Ok, interesting – let’s take a look.

In 2006 Björling was awarded with the “Jerusalem Prize” from the Zionist Federation in Sweden. The award is given to persons who has shown “extraordinary support for Israel, Jerusalem and Zionism”.

Zionist Federation of Sweden Presents the Jerusalem Prize

September 19, 2006
Israel’s Ambassador to Sweden, Eviatar Manor, presented the Jerusalem prize to parliamentarian Ewa Bjoerling.

The chairman of the Zionist Federation of Sweden, Mr. Bo Sallmander, introduced the prize winner and her courageous stand in defense of Israel and democracy against the ambiguous policies of the former Swedish government. Ms. Bjoerling is also a professor in microbiology at Karolinska Institute, specializing in the fight against HIV and AIDS.

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Swedish toymaker publishes ’gender-neutral’ children’s Christmas catalogue

From: RT.com

One of the largest toy chains in Sweden published a gender-neutral Christmas catalogue, which pictured boys playing with dolls and girls holding toy machine guns. The move has reignited a debate in Sweden over the proper place of gender roles.

Top Toy has produced children’s Christmas catalogues in Denmark and Sweden for both Toys R Us and BR. Though the catalogues’ page layouts are the same in both countries, the gender of the pictured kids is reversed in the Swedish edition.

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Sweden Arming The World: The Neutrality that Never Was

By Henrik Palmgren and Elizabeth Leafloor | RedIceCreations.com

 

Stockholm is bristling with weaponry today. Fighter jets can be seen and heard racing through the skies over a wondering populace. Is Sweden at war?
Not officially, but since WWII and despite a political position of neutrality, Sweden has been playing an increased role in international warfare. This can be clearly seen today, because this week FDS Nordic is taking place in Stockholm.

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